Podcasts tagged with ‘Lecture’

110 of 33 items

You See The Marsh, But Also Men And Women

by

Chris Manganiello of the Georgia Rivers Network talks about the pioneers of Georgia environmentalism. Eugene Odum, Jane Yarn and many others led a popular movement to pressure lawmakers in the late 1960’s to pass the Coastal Marshlands Protection Act, the most important piece of environmental legislation in Georgia.

Climate Conference Spotlights Georgia Science, Activism

by

Excerpts from interviews and presentations recorded at the “Prepare, Respond and Adapt – Is Georgia Climate Ready” conference on Jekyll Island. Subjects include tropical storms, droughts, fisheries, vulnerability assessments, living shorelines, energy, climate change skepticism and what we can do to fight global warming.

Water Is For Fighting Over

by

University of Colorado law professor William Boyd talks about groundwater on Georgia’s coast. He examines this precious resource through natural, historic, legal and political lenses. He focuses his talk on the water-intensive pulp and paper industry on the Savannah River.

A Place Is Not A Place Until It Has A Poet

by

Writer and environmental activist Janisse Ray talks about the Georgia coast as experienced through the brilliant language of our great authors. She explains how writers shape our sense of place and how lost vocabulary makes us speechless before nature.

Love This Place? Thank A Yankee

by

Coastal historian Buddy Sullivan talks about the northern industrialists who shaped the current state of Georgia’s coast, especially its protected barrier islands, in the century that followed the Civil War. His presentation was delivered at the “Coastal Nature, Coastal Culture” symposium organized by the Ossabaw Island Foundation.

The Wood That Built America

by

Environmental historian Albert Way of Kennesaw State University talks about the history of Georgia’s longleaf pine forests. He argues that longleaf pine is a foundational material of American industry. He presented this talk at the “Coastal Nature, Coastal Culture” symposium organized by the Ossabaw Island Foundation.

The Ghosts of Dunbar Creek

by

University of Michigan history professor Tiya Miles talks about “ghost tourism” and “flying African” stories in the South. Both turn historical fragments into supernatural tales. This lecture was recorded at the Coastal Nature, Coastal Culture symposium organized by the Ossabaw Island Foundation.

Horrible, Captivating Disaster Tourism Post Civil War

by

Historian Drew Swanson talks about post Civil War “disaster tourism” and how it relates to the South’s conservation movement. A professor at Wright State University, Swanson argues that postwar emphasis on wildness, recreation and isolation fueled later generations. He spoke at the Coastal Nature, Coastal Culture symposium organized by the Ossabaw Island Foundation.

Elvis Photos Feel Fresh, Modern

by

Art dealer Chris Murray talks about the photography exhibit “Elvis at 21.” On display at the Jepson Center for the Arts, the images capture Elvis Pressley in 1956, while the musician was still on the cusp on stardom. The photos were taken by Alfred Wertheimer.