Podcasts tagged with ‘African-American’

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The Ghosts of Dunbar Creek

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University of Michigan history professor Tiya Miles talks about “ghost tourism” and “flying African” stories in the South. Both turn historical fragments into supernatural tales. This lecture was recorded at the Coastal Nature, Coastal Culture symposium organized by the Ossabaw Island Foundation.

What If We Promoted King’s Legacy Every Day?

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Tybee Island activist Julia Pearce talks about her life-changing moments and latest causes. An inspiration, she shares advice on how to live and better the world. Pearce founded Tybee MLK, a year-round island legacy to non-violence and understanding.

Book Explores Campus, Savannah History

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Erik Brooks, author of “Tigers in the Tempest: Savannah State University and the Struggle for Civil Rights,” talks about the school’s 225 year history. He connects campus activities with larger events in the equality movement. And he isn’t afraid to delve into internal struggles on campus.

Images Explore Black History, Identity

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Artist, historian and writer Deborah Willis of New York University talks about the intersection of history, culture and identity in black images. Telfair Museums presented this lecture in connection with the exhibit “Mickalene Thomas at Giverny.” It was the 2015 Jacob and Gwendolyn Lawrence Lecture.

Bet You Didn’t Know

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Curator of fine arts and exhibitions for Telfair Museums, Courtney McNeil, talks about works by African-American artists in the museums’ permanent collection. You’ll hear about some heavyweights in the art world like Augusta Savage, Romaire Bearden, Sam Gilliam and Whitfield Lovell. She also talks about where the collection will grow from here.

Activist Keeps The Public In Public Meetings

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Political gadfly Ivan Cohen talks about his presence at school board, city council, county commission and library board meetings. For decades, he’s often been just one of a handful of people who bother to show up for public meetings. He talks about his early inspirations and political activities.

Music Inspired Art During Harlem Renaissance

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Artist and curator Dr. Margaret Rose Vendryes talks about the powerful mix of art and music in African-American history. Her main subject is the Harlem Renaissance. This talk is presented as an introduction to “The Visual Blues,” an art exhibit on display at the Jepson Center through May 3rd.

Sandfly Residents Seek Historic District Status

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Norman Luten, Jr. of the Sandfly Community Betterment Association talks about the fight against commercial encroachment. It started a decade ago with the new Wal-Mart. Now it’s flaring up again. The community is seeking Historic District protection.

Musician’s Career Spans Four Decades of Jazz

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Savannah trombonist Teddy Adams talks about his life in jazz. He explains how many of his musical connections go back to his Air Force duty in Japan. And he talks about why he believes jazz music doesn’t have mass market appeal.

Unearthing Hidden Landscapes Of Slavery

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Landscape architect and educator Kwesi DeGraft-Hanson talks about the 1858 sale of 429 slaves from the Pierce Butler plantation in Georgia. He uses historical records and public documents to unearth the hidden landscape of the sale. He shares remarkable stories about present day connections to it.