Podcasts tagged with ‘History’

110 of 36 items

The Refugee Story Is A Children’s Story

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Author Gwen Strauss talks about her children’s book, “The Hiding Game,” an intense and colorful profile of Varian Fry, who successfully hid and saved Jews and anti-Nazi refugees during WWII. Strauss describes her creative process, the timeliness of a refugee’s story and her personal connections with figures in the book.

75 Years Ago, War Came To Georgia’s Coast

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Historians Mimi Rogers and Michael Higgins talk about the submarine attacks that killed 22 mariners off the coast of Georgia on April 8th, 1942. Rogers, curator of the Coastal Georgia Historical Society, and Higgins, a retired merchant seamen, describe the torpedoing of the SS Oklahoma and Esso Baton Rouge near St. Simons Island.

Fragments Of Forgotten History Unearthed Near Golf Course

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Archaeologist Laura Seifert of Armstrong State University talks about a Catholic school for newly freed slaves built shortly after the end of the Civil War on Skidaway Island. Seifert and her students are excavating the short-lived school site, which is slated to become a home near a golf course in a gated community.

You See The Marsh, But Also Men And Women

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Chris Manganiello of the Georgia Rivers Network talks about the pioneers of Georgia environmentalism. Eugene Odum, Jane Yarn and many others led a popular movement to pressure lawmakers in the late 1960’s to pass the Coastal Marshlands Protection Act, the most important piece of environmental legislation in Georgia.

Water Is For Fighting Over

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University of Colorado law professor William Boyd talks about groundwater on Georgia’s coast. He examines this precious resource through natural, historic, legal and political lenses. He focuses his talk on the water-intensive pulp and paper industry on the Savannah River.

Gripping Historical Fiction Tackles Southern Jewry

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Savannah writer Jonathan Rabb talks about Southern Jews, the Holocaust, Jim Crow, otherness, acceptance and other big themes in his new book “Among the Living.” Set in 19-47 Savannah, it’s a gripping story about a concentration camp survivor as he discovers his path through sweeping changes in his own life and in the world around him.

A Place Is Not A Place Until It Has A Poet

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Writer and environmental activist Janisse Ray talks about the Georgia coast as experienced through the brilliant language of our great authors. She explains how writers shape our sense of place and how lost vocabulary makes us speechless before nature.

This Is Your Land, Explore It

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Jason Lee of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources and Christi Lambert of the Nature Conservancy talk about Altama Plantation Wildlife Management Area. Once a playground for the rich, this 4,000 acre waterfront tract is now a haven for wildlife. We explore its high and low areas, marveling at the plants, animals and natural silence.

Love This Place? Thank A Yankee

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Coastal historian Buddy Sullivan talks about the northern industrialists who shaped the current state of Georgia’s coast, especially its protected barrier islands, in the century that followed the Civil War. His presentation was delivered at the “Coastal Nature, Coastal Culture” symposium organized by the Ossabaw Island Foundation.

Lighthouse Enthusiast Can’t Stop Climbing

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Lighthouse enthusiast Bill Fulton talks about his hobby. He calls it lighthouse inspection. More like lighthouse tourism, his passion for coastal beacons has taken him from the Great Lakes to Florida. He has climbed between more than 200 lighthouses.