Podcasts tagged with ‘Environment’

110 of 25 items

Fighting Corporation, Community Finds Power

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Retired school teacher Peggy Riggins of Jesup talks about her unlikely activism. She and others led the successful fight to stop a corporation from bringing coal ash to the Altamaha River watershed. Republic Services eventually backed down.

You See The Marsh, But Also Men And Women

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Chris Manganiello of the Georgia Rivers Network talks about the pioneers of Georgia environmentalism. Eugene Odum, Jane Yarn and many others led a popular movement to pressure lawmakers in the late 1960’s to pass the Coastal Marshlands Protection Act, the most important piece of environmental legislation in Georgia.

Climate Conference Spotlights Georgia Science, Activism

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Excerpts from interviews and presentations recorded at the “Prepare, Respond and Adapt – Is Georgia Climate Ready” conference on Jekyll Island. Subjects include tropical storms, droughts, fisheries, vulnerability assessments, living shorelines, energy, climate change skepticism and what we can do to fight global warming.

Water Is For Fighting Over

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University of Colorado law professor William Boyd talks about groundwater on Georgia’s coast. He examines this precious resource through natural, historic, legal and political lenses. He focuses his talk on the water-intensive pulp and paper industry on the Savannah River.

A Place Is Not A Place Until It Has A Poet

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Writer and environmental activist Janisse Ray talks about the Georgia coast as experienced through the brilliant language of our great authors. She explains how writers shape our sense of place and how lost vocabulary makes us speechless before nature.

This Is Your Land, Explore It

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Jason Lee of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources and Christi Lambert of the Nature Conservancy talk about Altama Plantation Wildlife Management Area. Once a playground for the rich, this 4,000 acre waterfront tract is now a haven for wildlife. We explore its high and low areas, marveling at the plants, animals and natural silence.

Love This Place? Thank A Yankee

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Coastal historian Buddy Sullivan talks about the northern industrialists who shaped the current state of Georgia’s coast, especially its protected barrier islands, in the century that followed the Civil War. His presentation was delivered at the “Coastal Nature, Coastal Culture” symposium organized by the Ossabaw Island Foundation.

The Wood That Built America

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Environmental historian Albert Way of Kennesaw State University talks about the history of Georgia’s longleaf pine forests. He argues that longleaf pine is a foundational material of American industry. He presented this talk at the “Coastal Nature, Coastal Culture” symposium organized by the Ossabaw Island Foundation.

Naturalist Still Shares Unbound Enthusiasm

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South Carolina Naturalist Rudy Mancke talks about his award-winning careers in nature, education and broadcasting. His Zen-like television program NatureScene and his snappy radio segments Nature Notes are like walking in the woods with a friend. His unbound enthusiasm for the natural world makes the world a more eco-friendly place.

Horrible, Captivating Disaster Tourism Post Civil War

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Historian Drew Swanson talks about post Civil War “disaster tourism” and how it relates to the South’s conservation movement. A professor at Wright State University, Swanson argues that postwar emphasis on wildness, recreation and isolation fueled later generations. He spoke at the Coastal Nature, Coastal Culture symposium organized by the Ossabaw Island Foundation.