Podcasts tagged with ‘Books’

110 of 15 items

The Refugee Story Is A Children’s Story

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Author Gwen Strauss talks about her children’s book, “The Hiding Game,” an intense and colorful profile of Varian Fry, who successfully hid and saved Jews and anti-Nazi refugees during WWII. Strauss describes her creative process, the timeliness of a refugee’s story and her personal connections with figures in the book.

Finding Healing Between The Pages

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Retired drug enforcement agent Gordon Rayner and his wife Ella Mae Rayner talk about coming to terms with PTSD and depression. Battling bad dreams and foul moods, Gordon started writing memoirs and fictions at Senior Citizens, Inc. The experience, shared with Ella Mae, turned into two books and a more positive outlook on life.

Poet Finds A Sense Of Belonging

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Poet and photographer Danelle Lejeuene talks about how her life’s many different passions came together on Georgia’s coast. She explains how her Iowa background in farming and historic preservation has informed her work. She’s a literary mama with a bright future, expecting her first book, “Etymology of Whale-Fish and Grace,” next year.

Gripping Historical Fiction Tackles Southern Jewry

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Savannah writer Jonathan Rabb talks about Southern Jews, the Holocaust, Jim Crow, otherness, acceptance and other big themes in his new book “Among the Living.” Set in 19-47 Savannah, it’s a gripping story about a concentration camp survivor as he discovers his path through sweeping changes in his own life and in the world around him.

A Place Is Not A Place Until It Has A Poet

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Writer and environmental activist Janisse Ray talks about the Georgia coast as experienced through the brilliant language of our great authors. She explains how writers shape our sense of place and how lost vocabulary makes us speechless before nature.

Everything You Write Is Something You Know

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Savannah writer Bess Chappas talks about her book, The Wrath of Aphrodite. An old-fashioned romance novel, it features the colorful bar owner Pinke Masters and draws on Greek-American stereotypes. She also talks about her mother and other influences.

I Still Miss Him Every Day

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Retired educator Joseph Killorin, who taught at Armstrong State University for four decades, remembers his friendship with the great Savannah writer Conrad Aiken. He reflects on the tragic childhood events that shaped Aiken’s life and the “terrific” times that they both enjoyed in the writer’s waning years.

Turning Page, Writer Finds Magic In Savannah

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Savannah writer Beverly Willett talks about the inspirations behind her work, including her nationally-published articles about parenting and marriage. Her daughters and Buddhist meditation retreats inform her work. She also co-chairs the Coalition for Divorce Reform and talks about the constitutionality of no fault divorce.

Book Explores Campus, Savannah History

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Erik Brooks, author of “Tigers in the Tempest: Savannah State University and the Struggle for Civil Rights,” talks about the school’s 225 year history. He connects campus activities with larger events in the equality movement. And he isn’t afraid to delve into internal struggles on campus.

Author Challenges Conventional Views Of Education

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Massachusetts high school English teacher David McCullough, Jr. shares his advice for young adults. He talks about his meteoric rise to success. And he dismisses the importance of success or failure in adolescent development. This podcast touches on topics such as serendipity, wisdom and the American education system.