Ossabaw Island Foundation

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You See The Marsh, But Also Men And Women

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Chris Manganiello of the Georgia Rivers Network talks about the pioneers of Georgia environmentalism. Eugene Odum, Jane Yarn and many others led a popular movement to pressure lawmakers in the late 1960’s to pass the Coastal Marshlands Protection Act, the most important piece of environmental legislation in Georgia.

Water Is For Fighting Over

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University of Colorado law professor William Boyd talks about groundwater on Georgia’s coast. He examines this precious resource through natural, historic, legal and political lenses. He focuses his talk on the water-intensive pulp and paper industry on the Savannah River.

A Place Is Not A Place Until It Has A Poet

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Writer and environmental activist Janisse Ray talks about the Georgia coast as experienced through the brilliant language of our great authors. She explains how writers shape our sense of place and how lost vocabulary makes us speechless before nature.

Love This Place? Thank A Yankee

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Coastal historian Buddy Sullivan talks about the northern industrialists who shaped the current state of Georgia’s coast, especially its protected barrier islands, in the century that followed the Civil War. His presentation was delivered at the “Coastal Nature, Coastal Culture” symposium organized by the Ossabaw Island Foundation.

The Wood That Built America

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Environmental historian Albert Way of Kennesaw State University talks about the history of Georgia’s longleaf pine forests. He argues that longleaf pine is a foundational material of American industry. He presented this talk at the “Coastal Nature, Coastal Culture” symposium organized by the Ossabaw Island Foundation.

The Ghosts of Dunbar Creek

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University of Michigan history professor Tiya Miles talks about “ghost tourism” and “flying African” stories in the South. Both turn historical fragments into supernatural tales. This lecture was recorded at the Coastal Nature, Coastal Culture symposium organized by the Ossabaw Island Foundation.

Horrible, Captivating Disaster Tourism Post Civil War

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Historian Drew Swanson talks about post Civil War “disaster tourism” and how it relates to the South’s conservation movement. A professor at Wright State University, Swanson argues that postwar emphasis on wildness, recreation and isolation fueled later generations. He spoke at the Coastal Nature, Coastal Culture symposium organized by the Ossabaw Island Foundation.

People Lived Here Long Before Oglethorpe

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Archaeologist David Hurst Thomas of the American Museum of Natural History talks about our history before the English arrived in 1733. He explores Native American and Spanish facts that define “pre-Georgia” history. This talk was given at the “Coastal Nature, Coastal Culture” symposium presented by the Ossabaw Island Foundation.

Georgia Coast Has Inspired Dreamers Throughout History

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Environmental historian Mart Stewart of Western Washington University talks about islands, edges and the globe and how they relate to Georgia’s history. He says this place always has inspired dreamers. This was the keynote address at the “Coastal Nature, Coastal Culture” symposium presented by the Ossabaw Island Foundation.