Listener-Supported

110 of 122 items

When Nighttime Shadows Fall

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Retired social services administrator, writer and former Savannah-Chatham County School Board president Diane Cantor talks about her book “When Nighttime Shadows Fall.” With themes including sexuality, public health, teen pregnancy and women’s self-empowerment, the character-driven novel was set in 1970’s Appalachia and is very relevant to our own times.

The Horror Is In Your Head

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Fantasy horror writer Alledria Hurt talks about breaking molds and sticking to others within a broad literary genre. She talks about her influences and pet peeves. And she talks about putting African-American female characters front and center.

I Didn’t Really Understand How Lucky I Was

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Baritone Singer Kurt Ollmann talks about his career from theater in Wisconsin to opera on some of the world’s biggest stages. He considers himself lucky to have won a Grammy Award with Leonard Bernstein. He talks about moving to Savannah, what he’s doing now and his favorite music.

Symbol, Substance In Bridge Name Movement

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Pushing to change the name of Savannah’s Talmadge Bridge, Ronald Christopher talks about race, economics, education and our city’s future. A Savannah native who became a New York City lawyer and investment banker, Christopher returned to make the city better. But as of yet, he hasn’t found just the right place.

Legendary Name In Savannah Baking Returns

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Laurence and Michael Gottlieb talk about the latest incarnation of their family’s baking business, established in 1885. They explain the origins of their famous Chocolate Chewy cookie. And they talk about mental health in the hospitality industry.

Health Forces Chatham Farmer To Retire

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Farmer Willie Johnson talks about his 50-years at Promised Land Farms in Port Wentworth. Although he cites riding tractors and watching things grow as the best parts of his business, he’s clearly motivated more by his love for people and people’s love for him. Now his farming career is coming to an end.

Fighting Corporation, Community Finds Power

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Retired school teacher Peggy Riggins of Jesup talks about her unlikely activism. She and others led the successful fight to stop a corporation from bringing coal ash to the Altamaha River watershed. Republic Services eventually backed down.

I Am A Muslim And I Am Not A Terrorist

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Syrian refugee and new Savannah resident Naji Abousaleh talks about his journey to safety and freedom. Lauren Cruickshank, our area’s refugee resettlement coordinator for Lutheran Services of Georgia, talks about her organization’s services and what people can do to help.

Savannah’s Love Is On The Rise

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Singer Laiken Love talks about her emergence from choirs, karaoke bars and open mics to an in-demand vocalist. Whether it’s jazz, funk, blues, classical, pop, you name it, her style and talent are on show with Savannah’s best musicians. She talks about her own composition, “Promise.”